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Delayed service notifications in Icinga2

Icinga2 is used for monitoring my infrastructure. Some services are more noisy than others, and generate a lot of unnecessary warnings in a short time. A delayed notification rule is used to only raise alarms when the service is not OK for a prolonged period of time.

Icinga Director and disk checks for fuse mountpoints

When I rolled out my new Icinga2 installation, and added disk checks for all laptops, I ran into a small problem: there is a fuse mountpoint for logged in users which only the user can read. Apparently it has something to do with Flatpack.

How to configure notifications in Icinga2 Director

I'm using Icinga2 for a long time, but recently installed a new system and using Director for the first time. I know how to configure notifications in Icinga2 config files, but getting them working in Director (with Director options only) is a bit of a challenge. Here is a step-by-step to get simple mail notifications working. From there it should be easier to configure more advanced notifications.

Huginn: Monitor changes in websites

The Huginn software is not only good for monitoring Twitter feeds, it can also be used to monitor websites for changes.


Monitor software version changes with Huginn

Huginn is a great piece of software, but the documentation is … a bit sparse. Especially when it comes to details of the agents. I’m going to blog about a couple more more examples in the future.

For another project I’m using Leaflet, a JavaScript library for rendering maps in a browser. New versions are released occasionally, and I want to know when it’s time to update the project website. Huginn can do that.


Monitor website status with Huginn

After setting up Huginn, and implementing the actions on my todo list, I had a look at the available agents and started thinking what else they can be useful for.

One of the ideas I came up with is monitoring if a website is available, or has some trouble. I already have a monitoring system in place, but it’s a nice exercise to learn more about the other agents.


Grafana: select host for a dashboard

InfluxDB is running on a Raspberry Pi in my home network (with separate attached disk), and I installed a Grafana on top of it, to visualize crucial data.


Monitor additional details in Telegraf with the "Exec" input filter

After installing Telegraf and hooking up everything into InfluxDB, I was missing the status of my backups. Every system here creates encrypted backups every night, and stores them on a central NAS, and off-site. But I want to know statistics about the backups, and see if something is not working.

I’m using Restic for the backups (will blog about this another time). However Telegraf does not support Restic directly, I need a few workarounds. This blog post however is not directly about monitoring the backups, but about how to write your own plugin for Telegraf.


Install Telegraf using Ansible

I have an InfluxDB up and running in my network, and decided to monitor all (well, all possible - the QNAP seems to be a problem) devices. That’s quite easy to do by installing Telegraf as a server agent, and add some configuration. Everything is deployed using Ansible, so I can re-use the same Playbook for many devices.

Let’s assume I have a laptop which I want to monitor. The hostname is sunlight (it’s not, I’m just using this as an example).


Add InfluxDB settings in Telegraf using Ansible: [WARNING]: The value [...] (type list) in a string field was converted to "[...]" (type string)

I’m in the process of updating my entire home setup, and integrate everything properly. Part of this process is to automate everything, and use Ansible Playbooks to deploy devices and configurations.